What is the origin of rh negative people and blood

Of great interest to people in general is the question “where do we come from?”.
We have on this blog displayed several theories as well as evidence and indicators that might lead us into the right direction.
This is an ongoing process and if you are heavily into genetic research, you can also read Rh Negative Origins.
Having consulted a few scientists, I was told that it was unlikely blood type O was the first blood type, but also that a few hundred thousand years ago rh negative blood might have originated in Africa, though the rh negative blood type factor is presented quite low on the African continent. I was also informed that there was no cold hard evidence to back it up. So the jury is out.
Instead of focusing on what we do not know, here are a few things that we do know and should keep in mind when examining any types of theories or read something where a person claims to know something yet does not show any proof:

1) The Basque people are considered the first Europeans.

They are also the highest in rh negative blood in Europe when looking at larger groups other than maybe a few communities in Switzerland and the Netherlands with similar percentages if not higher than the Basques in France. Spanish Basques appear to have the highest frequencies of rh negative blood in Europe also indicating that Spanish Basques are less likely to intermarry with Spaniards than French Basques are with the French.
The origin of the Basque people is of great interest and a key to researching the origin of rh negative blood.
It could easily be that today’s Basques are an offspring of an original group which could have been 100 percent rh negative.
What is also interesting when examining old grave sites, that the further back you go in time, the higher the percentages of certain genetic markers become indicating that this reverse trend might show strong relationship to the ancient Hebrews as well as Sumerians.
You can read more on this subject matter here: Is there a Basque-Jewish-Rh Negative connection?

The claim that the Ait Haddidu Berbers of Morocco are 40% rh negative has been made a long time ago, but there are also studies out there contradicting this. Are Berbers really 40% rh negative? is our article examining this a little bit further and as usual, more studies are needed to determine if in fact there are high percentages of rh negative blood amongst the Berbers or at least certain groups.

The Bedouins of the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt have been mentioned in Kara RogersĀ“ work as being 18-30% rh negative. What is interesting about this particular group is the similarity between their male DNA and the male DNA of Cohanim Jews.

2) “Were the Neanderthals rh negative?”

This theory has been around for some time and it is important to examine it further. I have personally contacted the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany and was informed that the specimens examined in the Neanderthal Genome Project were not only rh positive, but didn’t even carry the rh negative (D) gene recessively meaning they were rh +/+ homozygotes.

But let us not assume that all Neanderthal tribes were alike. It could easily have been that there were groups exclusively rh positve and groups exclusively rh negative. When looking at the groups of people on earth today with the highest percentages of Neanderthal DNA, the Basques and the Berbers appear in the top 5 results. This of course could easily be seen as an indicator that the rh negative blood factor may have been brought to us through our Neanderthal ancestry.
However:
Amongst the top 5 are also the Chinese and the Japanese whose percentage of rh negative blood is extremely low.

Were the Neanderthals of the west high and the Neanderthals of the east low in rh negative blood?
We do not know this. But it could be something that makes sense when it comes to determining why some of us are high in rh negative blood percentage wise while in other regions they are not.

You can find a lot more information on this subject matter here …

This article will be updated frequently. So if you have additional information, please do not hesitate to leave a comment.

Be very careful when reading claims without proof or studies attached. It is much better to limit yourself to what we know and then examine further rather than believing something that is false and miss out on the facts because of walking on a wrong path.

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